Remembering Rob Bateman

Photo March 2009

Charles Harrell, Founder ProModel Corporation

Last month we lost a long-time member of the ProModel family and, for many of us, a beloved friend. Following a sudden incident of heart failure while working out in the gym, Rob Bateman passed away on October 11th 2015.  We at ProModel will remember him as a warm, energetic, impassioned leader and friend whose life was devoted to the pursuit of excellence and selfless service. His absence will continue to be profoundly felt in the months and years to come.

I first met Rob just over 25 years ago when he was doing graduate studies at BYU. He took a simulation class from me and I could tell he was excited about the potential benefits of simulation. So after completing a stint with the US state department as a foreign-service officer in 1990, Rob began working as a ProModel distributor. With his international background and grasp of simulation, Rob eventually become the Vice President of International Operations and later established an independent company (Dynamisis A.G.) for directing all international operations for ProModel.

DSC_1650

Robert Bateman

(April 4, 1958 – October 11, 2015)

Rob was an extraordinary individual with remarkable talents. He was one of those individuals who was always on-the-go and seemed to cram more into one day than most of us manage to accomplish in several days. At the same time, he maintained a zest for life and could frequently be seen buzzing around in his sports car with his signature driving cap or biking into work in his cycling shorts and helmet.

Here are a few of the many talents Rob displayed:

  • He was very knowledgeable…about everything. No matter what subject was being discussed, he always had something intelligent to contribute to the discussion. On top of his formal education, which culminated with a Ph.D. in Public Administration/Political Science, Rob filled his spare moments reading books or one of his 14 magazines he subscribed to.
  • As a consummate teacher he was passionate about getting people exposed to simulation. He wrote the first textbook on ProModel for use in college courses. For the past decade, when he wasn’t working with distributors to promote ProModel he was teaching at the local university.
  • He was an effective mentor and gave many individuals their first start in their careers. When several international distributors were asked what they remember about Rob, they invariably said he treated them as valued partners and became someone they could always turn to for advice.
  • He was resourceful and knew how to get by on very little sleep, food and comforts. When there wasn’t sufficient budget or resources to support an initiative he believed in, he somehow always managed to find the means needed to get the job done.
  • He was a real cosmopolitan and world traveler. If you ever called Rob, you would be just as likely reaching him at some airport as in his office. And there didn’t seem to be any country where he felt uncomfortable or couldn’t speak the language.
  • He was a friend to all and he never let business stand in the way of personal relationships. He took time to express an interest in others and always sensed if one was having a bad day or dealing with problems at home. He would do whatever he could to lift them up and help them keep things in perspective.
  • Finally, Rob was funny and had an infectious sense of humor. He could tell endless stories of his travel exploits where he encountered bizarre situations like returning to his car only to find all of his tires stolen. Though Rob took his commitments seriously, he never took himself too seriously.

Here are a few memories related by some of the distributers who worked with him.

A Distributor in Germany and Austria relates, “On my first trip to Utah to visit with Rob as a new ProModel rep, I had the feeling I was meeting with an old friend. I was impressed by his hospitality and the time that he gave me.”

A Brazilian distributor recalled meeting Rob the first time 21 years ago and thinking to himself, “Who is this guy who can conduct a meeting with high level business leaders, comfortably use legal and business terms in both German and English and then turn around the following day and teach a simulation course in Spanish to a group of engineers. How can one person have so many skills?”

As another of his co-workers commented, “I’ve been in rooms with him teaching and negotiating with Nigerians, Germans, Japanese, Brazilians, Mexicans, and more. No matter the nationality, Rob could relate and connect. He was confident, knowledgeable, and personable.”

On a personal note, one co-worker related: “This past year Rob joined the cycling team that I belong to called Team C4C (“Cycle for Cure”). The team was formed to raise money for health-related charities such as the Huntsman Cancer Center and the National MS Society. Rob immediately identified with the purpose of the group and quickly became one of the strongest riders on the team.”

This same co-worker related how Rob was instrumental in helping him complete a grueling ‘Ultimate Challenge’ cycling event saying, “I will always cherish a picture I have of Rob and me crossing the finish line together at Snowbird after riding 100 miles and climbing 10,000 feet in one day. I could not have made it without his encouragement along the way.”

For all those who have been influenced by his exemplary life, Rob will always be remembered as a leader, mentor and friend. Perhaps it is fitting that he pursued a career in simulation modeling since he seems to have understood the impact that models can have, not only on organizations, but on the people around him. Those who knew Rob, know that he was a model of the best that a human being can be, and for that he will always be remembered.

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