Ingalls Develops Automated Unit Lay-Down ‘Advisor’ with Capacity Planning Tool

Image_Ingalls from theSigal MagazineHuntington Ingalls Industries – Ingalls Shipbuilding (Ingalls) identified substantial savings potential in the lay-down placement and assignment process that had been previously utilized for managing asset location throughout the construction process.

Building four different hull forms in the tight shipyard footprint is a challenge. Ingalls Shipbuilding work instructions define the processes and responsibilities for the proper allocation and optimization of real estate (lay-down spaces) for structural units and assemblies under construction, while providing forward visibility for scheduled or potential overloads to capacity.

However, the old capacity planning processes were tedious and overly time-consuming. Resulting real estate allocations were seldom optimal and often required substantial rework to resolve space allocation conflicts, as the construction schedules for each hull form jockey for the same production resources.

The Ingalls team developed an automated process that optimizes unit layout and scheduling, and increases the construction of many units under a covered structure, significantly improving production rates—a plus in the hot southern climate.

“The new tool has taken a process that historically took 10 weeks to complete and can now finish the scheduling activity in less than an hour. Following project completion and full system implementation, we expect to reduce ‘real estate’ allocation processing time by 30% and place 20 more units ‘under cover’ annually, with an estimated cost savings of over $990K per year.”

 (Article Courtesy of “theSignal” and DefenseNews.com)

Click here to read the rest of the Ingalls story

Decision Support Tool Promotes Army’s Supply Chain Readiness

Two Department of Defense publications recently ran articles on the Army’s continuous pursuit of  supply chain excellence.  Our men and women in the military cannot do their jobs without the right materiel at the right place, at the right time, in the right quantity, and the right condition. ProModel Corporation is the software developer behind the Decision Support Tool (DST) featured in both articles.

Learn more about ProModel and our products, in booth #200 at the upcoming AUSA Global Force Symposium and Exposition on Mar 26-28 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL.

Decision Support Tool Promotes Army’s Supply Chain Readiness

“DST gives materiel managers the capability to realign equipment on their property books to maximize readiness or fulfill high-priority requirements. A plan that once took days to create can now be completed in minutes. With just a few clicks of the mouse, property book officers can optimize their formation, synchronizing existing equipment on-hand against authorization.”

– Lt. Col. Rodney Smith, chief, Distribution Integration Division, DMC.

Read full Army.mil article

AMC (Army Materiel Command) Restoring its Atrophied Repair Parts Inventory

Using a new system called the Decision Support Tool that Army Sustainment Command runs out of Rock Island Arsenal, Ill., “for the first time in my career, we can really see ourselves, and so we know where every single piece of equipment in the Army is, whether you are in the active component, the Reserve component or the National Guard. It’s never been that way; it’s very powerful.”

Army Materiel Command – General Gus Perna

Read full Defense News article

Huntsville Utilities Knows How to Win Back Customers

Watch this presentation from the 2017 E Source Forum Conference given by Huntsville Utilities on how they rebuilt customer relationships and prioritized customer experience (CX). ProModel played a role in this turnaround as mentioned starting at the 6:40 mark.

Speaking of Huntsville Alabama – We will be at the annual AUSA Global Force Symposium and Expo at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL Mar 26-28. Stop by ProModel booth #200 and check out our latest products and releases.

State Probation Office Assesses Jail Occupancy Rate with Simulation

CHALLENGES

The mission of the Office of Probation for any state in the US is to provide seamless services to the victims, communities, offenders, and courts of that state. The administration of probation is a complex and ever-changing process. Recently a state probation organization’s Sr. IT representative contacted ProModel looking for help understanding, analyzing, and improving its probation office processes. Its systems and infrastructure needed to be updated, but before that could begin they needed to understand the “As Is”condition of its processes and all that was involved.

During the project, the US Justice Department planned to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison—the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to non-violent drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. The inmates from federal prisons nationwide were set free between Oct. 30 and Nov. 2 of the same year. This followed action by the U.S. Sentencing Commission—that reduced the potential punishment for future drug offenders from the previous year and then made that change retroactive. The panel estimated that its change in sentencing guidelines eventually could result in 46,000 of the nation’s approximately 100,000 drug offenders in federal prison qualifying for early release.

It became important to also determine the impact of this action on this state’s probation services and local jail systems.

OBJECTIVES

The Probation Office was interested in using Predictive Analytics to analyze the as-is condition of its processes:

• Where might there be any bottlenecks or constraints?

• Assess the impact of the new law on the probation office workload and the local county jail occupancy rate.

• Where could other improvements be made?

SOLUTION

In order to model and simulate the current processes, they needed to be fully understood and documented. ProModel’s resident lean expert was brought in to work with Office of Probation personnel to create a quick high-level Process Simulator Model of the voucher process. Together in a room with four or five probation team employees, ProModel documented in Microsoft Visio, the ins and outs of the voucher system. When this model was built and simulated, the results so closely resembled the realities of the current process and resource utilization of certain team members, that the go-ahead was given to proceed to a complete model of the voucher process.

The entire probation process was modeled and simulated by several experienced members of the ProModel consulting team, along with Office of Probation personnel. The following processes models were completed:

1. Voucher process

2. Juvenile probation process

3. Adult probation process

4. Problem-solving court process

Probation Voucher Process_Image_5

One Part of the Overall Model

VALUE PROVIDED

As part of the law change, convicts who are guilty of certain felonies will spend part of their sentence in probation instead of spending all of it in prison. These felons are at a higher risk level than the current average probationer, and will likely cause a disproportionate workload increase on the probation officers as well as take up county jail space should custodial sanctions need to be implemented.

This simulation model clearly communicated that the current processes and resources available were not adequate to handle the predicted increases in probation candidates. Several areas of the process were evaluated for improvements and the model was used to validate several proposed IT enablers and Lean modifications.

 

Joint Force Capability Catalog (JFCC)

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Rob Wedertz – VP DoD Programs

The United States Military consists of more than 4 million active and reserve men and women, operates at 800 military bases in over 70 countries and has an annual budget of nearly $600B.  The requirements to manage this force globally and ensure it is adequately equipped, trained, and ready to implement both our National Security Strategy and National Military Strategy are daunting tasks.  For the military planners who must provide the most sound and reasoned advice to military and civilian decision makers who ultimately have the authority to direct the forces to carry out the global strategy, detailed information about these forces must be readily available and current.

The Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff has doctrinally mandated the integration of Enterprise Force Structure data (Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps forces – capability, readiness, availability and employment) via the Global Force Management – Data Initiative.  This effort will provide the Force Providers (Services), the Combatant Commanders (Force Requirements), and the Joint Staff (Force Allocators) with a technology-enabled Decision Support Platform to carry out the National Military Strategy.

The Joint Staff J35S has been tasked with the technology implementation of this capability, called the Joint Force Capability Catalog (JFCC).  The Joint Staff J35S has chosen ProModel Corporation to design, develop, and implement the JFCC.

JFCC Dashboard

ProModel was chosen as the lead software provider based upon our deep-seeded experience providing Decision Support Tools such as the ARFORGEN Synchronization Toolset (AST), the Lead Materiel Integrator – Decision Support Tool (LMI-DST), and the Naval Synchronization Toolset (NST).

The JFCC is a “sea change” for the Global Force Management community because it is not being developed as a stand-alone platform, but rather as an integrated system with the capability to:

  • Aggregate data from more than 60 disparate systems
  • Present the data in a user-friendly graphical user interface
  • Conduct Course of Action (COA) predictive analysis

The JFCC ultimately provides stakeholders with the ability to do the following:

  • Account for forces and capabilities committed to ongoing operations and changing unit availability
  • Identify the most appropriate and responsive force for capability to meet Combatant Commander requirements
  • Identify risk for the Secretary of Defense associated with sourcing recommendations
  • Improve the Department of Defense’s ability to win multiple overlapping conflicts
  • Improve the Department of Defense’s responsiveness to unforeseen contingencies
  • Provide predictability of the Services’ rotational force requirements
  • Identify forces and capabilities that are unsourced or hard to source

ProModel is proud to have been chosen to provide this much needed capability to the Department of Defense.

ProModel at the Olympics 2016 and 2002

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Alain de Norman, President of Belge, ProModel’s Brazilian based partner was in attendance at the several events during the 2016 Olympics.  He was kind enough to provide us with some great shots he took during several of those events. One shot shows a US basketball player blocking a shot from one of the French players. There is another great shot of a long jumper and it shows the progression of his jump. Check out the montage video below:

Here is a video of some of that same US vs France Basketball game.

Thanks for sharing those great images of the 2016 Olympic Games Alain!  Here is a link to the Belge website for more information about the services they provide in Brazil.  http://www.belge.com.br

ProModel also has some experience with Olympic venues.  Take a look back at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City and the ProModel Solution that made it all possible! The 2002 Winter Olympics were one of the most complex logistics challenges ever. ProModel products and services were used to design security systems and bus transportation for most of the venues. The predictive technology enabled the Salt Lake Organizing Committee to model and test various scenarios related to security operations, weather, and transportation system design.

simulationgames

Click to read the full story in IIE Solutions Magazine.

If you would like more information about ProModel solutions contact us.

 

 

 

 

 

Army Logistics Embraces Predictive Analytics

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Pat Sullivan – VP Army Programs

“The purpose of predictive analysis is to determine the impact of resourcing decisions, alternatives, changes to strategy, and demand for forces, on Army readiness.  Impacts must be assessed over the near and mid-term … Unforeseen changes in funding, demand for forces, or other factors have varying degrees of impact on current projections.” – Army Regulation 525-30. Unfortunately, the complex mathematics and stringent analysis that are necessary for predictive analytics have been performed typically by folks from the Center for Army Analysis or by cells of operational research specialists spread across the force.  The challenge for all analysts, from an operational perspective, has been in compiling the data and creating a picture that is worthy of command-level decision making.

The Army Materiel Command (AMC) has pressed forward in applying predictive analytics to create greater efficiency in supporting the Army through the Logistics Readiness Centers (LRCs).  As part of the AMC mission to provide logistical services, the command assumed responsibility for 73 LRCs worldwide.  The purpose of a LRC is to provide installation support with a broad range of essential services that include maintenance, food service, ammunition, general supply, and laundry.  Since assuming this mission, AMC has been squarely focused on enhancing customer satisfaction and readiness while efficiently managing a dwindling budget—not an easy task.

In July 2014, ProModel initiated a proof of concept (POC) project in support of AMC for a decision-making capability that will accommodate both the overall enterprise level and the tactical, local level of the LRCs.  The project required ProModel to learn LRC processes and to evaluate and analyze existing LRC maintenance records in order to identify areas for potential improvement.  For the purposes of the POC project, AMC decided to focus the efforts on one LRC, therefore the process-education and data-collection efforts required for the creation, extraction, and compilation of data were focused on the Ft. Hood LRC.  During the POC effort, ProModel pinpointed the data necessary for analysis and identified several functional needs at the LRC level.  For example, Ft. Hood LRC management expressed a need for a labor-optimization software tool that can take into account labor requirements and overtime planning on a local, LRC-based level.

The software model of processes developed for Ft. Hood was proven to work, so a scaled enterprise solution is currently in development.  The model provided sufficient evidence that the trial scenarios created during the project can be expanded to a larger scale and adapted to incorporate additional requirements.  ProModel is now tasked with delivering a labor optimization capability and a workload-management software module to support the operations of the Army Field Support Brigades (AFSBs) that manage a number of LRCs.  This new capability will enable business-case analysis of the movement of future workloads from one location to another, and it will facilitate the consolidation of resources in order to support a requirement at a particular location.

The POC effort demonstrated that, by incorporating predictive analytic methods into a custom software application, the AMC, the U.S. Army Sustainment Command, the AFSBs, and the individual LRCs will have decision-support capabilities to accommodate trial “what-if” scenarios and experimental process simulations at both the enterprise and local levels.  AMC is proceeding to the next level of development of a software tool with enterprise-wide applicability.  Soon, AMC will experience a substantial positive effect on the command’s process efficiency and on the resulting cost-management controls.  ProModel is confident that this development will provide to the AMC and to the Army a great, leading-edge, predictive-analytic tool that will change the culture of Army logistics management.

Contact VP of Army Programs – Pat Sullivan  for more information. Or, visit our web site to learn more.