ProModel and Autodesk – Partners in Optimal Factory Design

Autodesk, the creator of AutoCAD® and Inventor® software, and ProModel have teamed up to bring you the best of both worlds of factory design and process optimization.  ProModel’s Process Simulator Autodesk Edition and ProModel Optimization Suite Autodesk Edition connect to Autodesk’s AutoCAD, Inventor, and Factory Design Utilities in order to streamline model building, process optimization and ultimately facility design.  You can get a 30-day evaluation version of both products from the Autodesk App Store

Process Simulator Autodesk Edition Eval

ProModel Optimization Suite Autodesk Edition Eval

Check out these great new Process Simulator Autodesk Edition videos:

Executive Overview – 2 min

 

Detailed Overview – 6 min


 

An Introduction to Manufacturing Process Simulation at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Rose-Hulman McCormack_Jay

Dr. Jay McCormack; Rose-Hulman – Associate Professor Mechanical Engineering

I teach classes in both the mechanical engineering and engineering design programs at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in the areas of design and manufacturing. Rose is a small college in Terre Haute, Indiana focused on STEM. In the mechanical engineering program, one of the courses that we find differentiates our graduates is a junior level course on design for manufacturing. Instead of focusing on the sciences of manufacturing processes (which is clearly very valuable also), our course focuses on the application of design principles to facilitate the manufacturing of a given product, comparison of various manufacturing methods, and supporting design best practices related to manufacturing such as geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.

Two years ago, one member of the teaching team, the original creator of our design for manufacturing class, proposed integrating a process simulation project into the course. Our students are exposed to many manufacturing methods and work in depth with a few, but never had any exposure to manufacturing process. This is arguably appropriate content for any mechanical engineer but, a robotics minor is popular with our mechanical engineers, and many of the robotics students end up in positions related to manufacturing. Additionally, many biomedical engineers take the course and end up working as process engineers for medical device manufacturers. Therefore, the need was there for students to get a first exposure to manufacturing process and process simulation. I had some experience with process simulation more than a decade ago and experience with lean manufacturing so I was elected (appointed) by the teaching team to develop the project. I was familiar with ProModel products, but it had been a while since I used any simulation tools. I evaluated Process Simulator, a tool from ProModel that installs as a plug in to Microsoft Visio, and several other products, but found that Process Simulator allowed me to get students from zero to their first model quickly. After choosing Process Simulator and discussing the options to get the software from ProModel, I started developing the project.

Project Outcomes

My first objective was to develop the learning outcomes for the project. There were a few factors driving the learning outcomes:

  1. The students were almost exclusively novices. Virtually none of the 175 students in the course had any experience with any process simulation software, so the learning outcomes had to include low Bloom’s level items focused on both manufacturing topics and Process Simulator concepts.
  2. The design for manufacturing course itself has a number of bottlenecks involving other projects. Several hands on course projects involve specialized equipment and technician time. These projects require creative scheduling to get all students equal access to these resources in an eight-week period. Consequently, the learning outcomes and process simulation project were scoped to allow students to work in a self-directed manner with a given set of tutorial videos, feedback from their instructor, and a due dates that varied for project teams.

At the successful completion of this project, students will be able to:

  1. Define manufacturing process terms – batch, process, inventory, WIP, workstation, buffer, cycle time.
  2. Define fundamental Process Simulator concepts – entity, resource, activity, routing, arrival, setting simulation properties, batching, buffers, and priority.
  3. Apply Process Simulator to model a manufacturing process using the fundamental concepts.
  4. Redesign a manufacturing process using Process Simulator.

Even with just those basic concepts the students were able to create useful Process Simulator models of a given manufacturing process. Additionally, the model was sufficiently complex to require creative experimentation and exploration in order to make improvements.

Project Overview

The objective given to students was to use Process Simulator to model the performance of a factory, suggest improvements to the factory, and measure the impact of the improvements. Excerpts from the project description follow and a link to the complete project description is located at the end of this article.

Scenario

You are an engineer at HOBO Inc. (Hands On Bottle Opener, Inc.), producers of a line of extruded, one-handed bottle openers (The Blue Collar, Figure 1) that appeal to customers through durability, reliability, and functionality. You were on the new product development team that designed a new, beautiful, and refined one-handed bottle opener (The Executive, Figure 2) that will allow you to enter an untapped market. The new design is fabricated using an investment casting process that fits well with the geometric complexity and modest volume of production planned for the new model. Because investment casting is not part of HOBO’s core competency, you will outsource the casting. HOBO will receive a shipment of boxes of unfinished casting trees from the fabricator every morning. Each bottle opener will be sawn from the casting tree then tumbled to remove burrs and to produce better surface finish. Sawing, tumbling, and the subsequent inspection step are among our core competencies, so we plan to perform these operations in house on an existing production line. Additionally, we have two workers that are available on the day shift to be used as much as they are needed. (Note that they will not be fired if they are not used all day. We have work for them elsewhere in the factory.) 

This seems like a great opportunity to try the new process simulation software that you are evaluating for purchase. You gathered some baseline data about the operation (see the Factory Description) based on the verbal description by other engineers and managers. The information that you gathered is in the section called Baseline Factory Description.

Baseline Factory Description

There are four workstations. In order, they are:

  1. Receiving
  2. Sawing
  3. Tumbling
  4. Inspection

There are buffers to store work in process (WIP) located before sawing and before tumbling. A flowchart representing the process is shown in Figure 3. A process box for each workstation and the buffers is shown in Table 1. A more complete description of each is found after the table.

Rose-Hulman_Material Flow

Figure 3. Flow of Materials through the Baseline Factory

Deliverables

In order to earn a C Use Process Simulator software to provide a baseline estimate of net income (revenue – expenses) for the first year of operation. The Baseline Factory must follow all the process rules and procedures outlined in the Baseline Factory Description section. Write a memo summarizing the findings.
In order to earn a B Design meaningful improvements to the Baseline Factory. Describe the Improved Factory in the memo by capturing each of the suggested improvements.
In order to earn an A Use Process Simulator to model the Improved Factory. Report the improvement in yearly net income in the memo.

Details about the baseline factory are provided in subsequent sections, as is a set of tutorial videos that guide students through basic concepts. The videos are a mix of guided examples recorded by me and videos provided by ProModel.

Takeaways

This project was first developed and used in academic year 2018-2019. We were pleased with the enthusiasm that students approached the project and engaged in competition to produce the most profitable manufacturing process compared to their peers. We revised the project for 2019-2020 to include a grading scale that further encouraged exploration and a set of tutorial videos walking students through a given omelet station Process Simulator model.

All of the students received a base level exposure to process simulation, but we were pleased to see that a number of students dove deeper into manufacturing process issues. Students challenged the notion that inspection was required to wait until the last process step, unknowingly suggesting the use of quality at the source, a fundamental lean concept. Those students were able to see the positive impact of quality at the source in their Process Simulator models. Other students had insights about the impact of batch work and how batches served as mechanisms for covering root cause process issues. Those students reduced batch sizes where possible and identified the root cause problems.

The complete project description, scoring rubric, and tutorial video list is linked here. You are welcome to reuse it, modify it, make it better, and/or fix mistakes. If you do, let me know at mccormac@rose-hulman.edu. We look forward to featuring Process Simulator as part of our design for manufacturing course in future years and finding new ways to challenge students to explore manufacturing processes and process simulation.

Bio

Dr. Jay McCormack is an Associate Professor of mechanical engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Dr. McCormack’s teaching and professional development interests are in the areas of design and manufacturing. He teaches courses for the mechanical engineering and engineering design programs as well as the institute’s multidisciplinary design course. Before joining Rose-Hulman, Dr. McCormack was a faculty member at the University of Idaho where he worked with the state’s manufacturing extension partnership. He co-founded Pittsburgh-based CAD tool developer DesignAdvance Systems Inc. after graduating from Carnegie Mellon with a PhD in mechanical engineering.

Product Launch – Process Simulator Material Handling Edition

Aaron Nelson Product Dev. Manager Process Simulator

Aaron Nelson Product Manager

I am excited to announce the launch of the Process Simulator Material Handling Edition. This edition of Process Simulator now supports modeling material flow.

Along with the drawing environment being scaled, you now will have access to Stations, Conveyors, Path Networks and Nodes.

Image_PCS MH MFG Demo Model

Stations – A new type of activity created to enhance material handling. The station can have capacity or capacity can be turned off—designed to be used with conveyors.

  • The user can insert an on-board station into a conveyor.

pcs-station

pcs-station-properties

Conveyors – A new connector with properties to control how entities flow from activity to activity. Introducing stations in a conveyor will enhance the ability to control flow from conveyor to conveyor

  • Control speed of conveyors
  • Control distance of conveyors
  • Control orientation of entities
  • Control accumulation of entities

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pcs-conveyor-properties

Path networks – Resource movement can be added to enhance your model with travel, pick up, and deposit time.

pcs-path-networks-1

pcs-path-networks-2

Material Handling usage in a manufacturing environment is obvious, but maybe not as obvious in a Healthcare Environment, but it can be valuable there too.  One example is delivering prescriptions from the hospital pharmacy to a pick-up point on each floor, from where they would be picked up and delivered to patient rooms.

Image_PCS MH HC Demo Model

You can see additional features on the Process Simulator Material Handling Edition webpage.  You can also watch our introductory webinar on how to use this new edition on the website refresher course page

Thanks for your continued business and support.  We wish you and your family good health!  Let me know if you have any questions or comments on the material handling functionality.

Aaron

 

Visualizing your Shipyard with Shipyard AI

Shipyard AI, ProModel’s dedicated shipbuilding application, continues to evolve and develop new capabilities – With five software releases in 2019, desired improvements in shipyard capacity management, optimization, scheduling and process engineering have been realized.   In addition, there has been a heavy emphasis on improving management’s ability to visualize shipyard production at both the strategic and tactical levels, at a single glance.

Building on a Strong Foundation

Historically, Shipyard AI has provided solid data and process information in highly detailed representations.  The application has included the following key visualizations, which we’ve continued to refine and improve over the years.

The Laydown map provides a top-down view of the entire shipyard with animation showing the progress of ship construction over time.

Image_syai-visualiaztion-article-laydown-map

Capacity Utilization Package (CUP) reports visualize resource utilization over time.

Image_syai-visualiaztion-article-cup-report

The Schedule screen features a Gantt chart representation of hull construction.

Image_syai-visualiaztion-article-schedule

The Unit Template Tree report shows a hierarchical breakdown of a hull into its component grand blocks, blocks, panels, etc.

Image_syai-visualiaztion-article-unit-template-tree

New Ways of Seeing the Shipyard

A recent emphasis on developing new types of visualizations is bearing fruit. This article introduces new ways of seeing the shipyard: the strategic Milestone Chart, the more tactical Location Resource View, and an updated Map Shapes editor.

Milestone Chart

A new Milestone Chart on the Hulls screen provides a strategic management view — visualizing the production of many hulls across long periods of time in a single view.

Image_SYAI Hulls Screen With Milestone Chart Nov 2019

Location Resource View

The Location Resource View report shows unit placements over time grouped by location.

This view allows you to interface with a unit and its dependencies in a single action, reducing the time needed and the possible introduction of errors. It provides a visualization of space in the shipyard over time to help you quickly make re-planning decisions.

Image_SYAI Location Resource View Report Nov 2019

Map Shape Editor

In an upcoming release, we’ll provide a map shapes editor to allow you to quickly add and edit unit shapes.

You can assign map shapes at the unit template level to have units appear on the Laydown Map with the correct shape.

Image_SYAI Map Shape Editor

See the What’s New Shipyard AI Webpage for more details on this year’s releases.

Process Simulator and ProModel Now Integrate with AutoCAD and Inventor by Autodesk

We are very excited to announce Process Simulator Autodesk® Edition and ProModel Autodesk® Edition.  Each product integrates with Autodesk® AutoCAD® and Autodesk® Inventor® to provide you a more valuable manufacturing plant design and process improvement capability.

For more information about Process Simulator Autodesk Edition, including videos, a downloadable pdf, and a 30-day evaluation copy go to the Process Simulator Autodesk Edition webpage.

For more information about ProModel Autodesk Edition, including videos, a downloadable pdf, and a 30-day evaluation copy go to the ProModel Autodesk Edition webpage.

If you are at the Autodesk University event this week (11/19-11/21) in Las Vegas stop by booth MFG210 to get a live demo and talk to our team.

Yes – DevSecOps Can be Done, and Done Well

Weeds picture

Rob Wedertz – VP DoD Programs

DevSecOps Diagram

Inarguably, the pace of change in the technology environment outpaces the program and acquisition oversight within the Department of Defense.  I don’t believe this is a controversial statement.  C-SPAN is riddled with testimony of senior ranking DOD officials asserting the same.  The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) is littered with language encouraging the Department to accelerate the adoption of rapid acquisition methodologies.  Nowhere is the delta between advanced technology capabilities and the Department’s ability to procure these capabilities more prevalent than in Software (i.e. Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Discrete Event Simulation).  And even more specifically, it is the incorporation of the development methodologies, for example DevSecOps, that often befuddles program managers, contracting officers, and even leadership, as this methodology is counter to acquisition guidelines and requirements oversight.

In an effort to close the delta, the Department has established bodies (e.g. DoD Enterprise DevSecOps Community of Practice – a Joint effort among DoD CIO, OUSD (A&S), and DISA; the Defense Innovation Board, the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, and others) to “sanctify” best practices and is actively campaigning to align acquisition and procurement with best in breed enabling technologies and development methodologies.  Because we have been charged with designing, developing, and implementing the Joint Staff’s Global Force Management Decision Support Platform (ORION), we are actively “leaning out over our skis” to demonstrate that DevSecOps can and should be done.

As a software development company tasked to deliver leading edge technology-enabled decision support platforms to the Joint Staff, there is little more deflating than telling our platform leads that they cannot implement the best in breed capabilities (i.e. open-source software, enablers, architectures, etc.) because the product is evolving so quickly that we cannot introduce it into the Risk Management Framework accreditation sphere.

Fortunately for us, we were introduced to Defense Innovative Unit (DIU) (then with an “experimental” on the tail) early in the ORION development process. They were encouraged by our startup mentality developed in support of our commercial products and they encouraged our government oversight to think about things like; Minimally Viable Products (MVPs), continuous User Engagement, and leveraging modern technology and platforms.  During their assessment of the ORION Joint Platform (at the time known as the Joint Force Capabilities Catalog (JFCC) / Global Laydown Server (GLS)) DIU acknowledged that we were already accomplishing the things they suggested.  They passed as much to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his support staff.  Achieving this level of maturity didn’t happen overnight.

We lived the painfully slow migration from “waterfall” acquisition and associated development practices to Agile, and are on the leading edge of DevSecOps.  In fact, as DoD CIO, OUSD (A&S), and DISA work through “sanctifying” the DoD Enterprise DevSecOps maturity model (via a Community of Practice), and the Defense Innovation Board awaits the response to their Software Acquisition and Practices (SWAP) study published in April of this year, we’re already demonstrating that the DevSecOps model works, can be implemented at no additional cost to the government, and perhaps most importantly, is scalable.  Case in point – when we began the ORION project, we were squarely in the “rapid prototyping” phase of development as the overarching requirements were being developed, and oversight was being codified.  The early days required rapid deliveries and constant engagements with users, all while adhering to information assurance requirements and cyber security.  (Note – we were (and are) deploying code to the SIPRNet, a production environment, every 2 weeks – functionality that is Beta, IOC, and FOC simultaneously.)  Achieving and sustaining this level of S/W development maturity is difficult and often requires a champion.

Advocacy is paramount.  It is not enough to be an innovative company with technical “chops”.  You MUST have a program sponsor that endorses the DevSecOps methodology and removes legacy critical barriers that prevent innovation at the speed required.  (It does not hurt that our advocacy was a shared understanding and endorsement from the sitting CJCS and the leadership of DIU.  That we were doing it was the result of technical leadership and guidance provided by our Joint Staff J35S Program Manager; that we are continuing to do it is the result of the senior leaders of the DOD acknowledging that is the way it SHOULD be done.  Early in the project, the J35 Deputy Director of Regional Operations, briefed the entirety of the Joint Staff (J-DIRs, Director, and Chairman) and the Deputy Secretary of Defense.  Paraphrasing his remarks, [sic] “these guys are pushing the envelope on s/w development.  They sprint, they fail, they recover, they deliver, they iterate – we win.”

Perhaps the lynchpin in achieving technical maturity in an oftentimes legacy environment is the simple acknowledgement that requirements WILL change.  When we started ORION, Globally Integrated Operations and Dynamic Force Employment were not yet established in policy.  Had we developed and delivered an application that was a reflection of solely the original requirements specifications, both the program and our platform would now be obsolete.  Fortunately we’ve been allowed to iterate throughout the software development lifecycle.  Continuous user feedback and rapid development cycles have facilitated relevance and viability that have ultimately enabled the Joint Staff to make Better Decisions, Faster.

Aligning the DevSecOps methodology with Scaled Agile Framework has additionally ensured that ProModel is permeating best practices not only across our DOD vertical but also in our COTS and Healthcare spaces as well.  Our collective roadmap is articulated in the Defense Innovation Board’s Software Acquisition and Practices (SWAP) study graphic below.  Our objective is to live in the “Do’s” and demonstrate that we can and should avoid the “Don’ts.  ORION is validation that it can be done.

Process Simulator 2019 SP3

Aaron Nelson Product Dev. Manager Process Simulator

Aaron Nelson Product Development Manager Process Simulator

We are excited to announce the release of Process Simulator 2019 Service Pack 3. This version of Process Simulator supports both 32 and 64-bit editions of Microsoft Visio 2016 and 2019. SP3 is for everyone. You will be prompted for an auto update when you sign into SP2 or earlier.

What’s New in SP3 ?

Ribbon Enhancements

  • Create and Install Package are now under More Tools within the Tools section of the ribbon.
  • Convert Diagram will now show on the right hand side of the tool bar only IF the file needs to be converted to a Process Simulator 2019 simulation model.

Image_PCS2019SP3_Ribbon

Image_PCS2019SP3_MORETOOLS

  • Model Elements buttons can be toggled on/off. You can select a model element and the button will stay selected and can be deselected to close that Element window.
  • Resource Grouping is now within the More Elements dropdown of the Model Elements section.

Properties Enhancements

  • Process Simulator’s Properties window has been a great addition to Process Simulator 2019’s User Interface. We have now grouped essential processing elements together.
  • We have also added indicator icons to show which sections in Properties have additional information. These indicator icons will show for LogicMulti EntitySetupDowntimes, and Notes. If there is nothing in the section you will not see the icon.

Image_PCS2019SP3_PROPERTIESACTIVITY

  • When you hover over Notes or Logic, the icon will display a preview of the contents of the section. Clicking the icon will now take you into the section as well.

Image_PCS2019SP3_PROPERTIESLOGIC

Model Compilation Speed Increase

Speed of Model Compilation after you select Simulate has been optimized. Benchmarking indicated a 125–135% improvement over Process Simulator 2019 SP2

How to Download SP3 ?

This product is available for download from the Solutions Café as well as our downloads site (just ask Support to send you a link).

If you have any questions, please contact ProModel Customer Support at 888-776-6633 or support@promodel.com.

Successful Implementation of FutureFlow Rx® at Seattle Children’s – A New Predictive Patient Flow Technology

Dan Hickman Avatar1

Dan Hickman ProModel CTO

I am jazzed about our FutureFlow Rx work with Seattle Children’s Hospital.  What a great group of people to collaborate with.  Check out the press release below and feel free to contact me if you’d like to learn more about this new product – dhickman@promodel.com

Thanks, Dan

Seattle Childrens Logo

Integrated Discrete Event Simulation Census Predictor, Developed by ProModel Corporation, Facilitates Inpatient Flow and Access Management

SEATTLE WA, May 14, 2019 – ProModel Corporation announced the successful implementation of a new predictive patient flow technology called FutureFlow Rx® at Seattle Children’s (SC).

Members of the Enterprise Analytics Community at Seattle Children’s will be presenting their use case at the Advanced Analytics for Children’s Hospitals Conference on June 5-6 at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. Seattle Children’s is a co-sponsor of this new analytics conference.

Seattle Children’s, like many other hospitals, faces challenges associated with capacity pressures and inpatient access. Demand for inpatient space often outstrips capacity, whether for physical or staffed beds.

SC leadership has established policy that scheduled elective surgeries must not be canceled due to capacity. Therefore, proactively managing inpatient capacity and staffing takes on even greater urgency in that context. In order to address this issue, they deployed a predictive-analytics solution for census estimation known as FutureFlow Rx®.

Seattle Children’s Quotes

“By providing accurate projections of staffing needs, FutureFlow Rx informs daily challenges faced by every hospital with timely and detailed information.” 

  • Susan Geiduschek, RN, DNP, Sr. Dir, Assoc. Chief Nurse, Seattle Children’s

 

“Integrating FutureFlow Rx into our Inpatient Access and Flow workstreams has really supported a smooth, functional, and most importantly effective process for proactively managing census during an especially challenging flu season. Diversions are down, and so is the general level of anxiety around decision-making. Fewer ad hoc huddles, more standard work with established guiderails and actions.”

  • Ruth McDonald, MD, Assoc. Chief Medical Officer, Seattle Children’s

 

Right Patient, Right Bed, Right Time

The functional goal of every hospital is to place the right patient in the right bed at the right time. Being the region’s only tertiary-care pediatric facility, it is paramount that SC maintain capacity to serve those children that cannot receive care elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest.

Thus, they must carefully maintain capacity and ensure as few diversions as possible. Combining the FutureFlow Rx® prediction with an application designed by SC Enterprise Analytics staff, they can accurately estimate their ability to manage daily and predicted census, allowing them to proactively make operational decisions that address challenges with foresight.

ProModel Quote

“We are very excited to be working with a hospital as visionary as Seattle Children’s.  They were willing to look beyond what existed today, to determine if a patient flow improvement platform could truly help increase safe inpatient access for their young patients”  Dan Hickman – CTO, ProModel Corporation

About ProModel Corporation

ProModel Corporation is a leading provider of simulation-based, predictive and prescriptive analytic decision support solutions. A Microsoft Gold Partner, ProModel specializes in custom and COTS (Commercial-Off-the-Shelf) software and services to help organizations optimize processes, policies and resource decisions to best align with their business strategy.

Founded in 1988, ProModel has tens of thousands of users of its software globally, focused across the Healthcare, Pharmaceutical, Government and Manufacturing & Supply Chain industries.

For additional information: ProModel Marketing 610-628-6842; healthcaresolutions@promodel.com

Predictive Variables, Artificial Neural Networks and Discrete Event Simulation in Manufacturing

Rebecca Santos

Rebecca Santos ProModel Tech Support Engineer

During my Master’s program at BYU, I worked with a team to complete my thesis.  The work turned into a published article by the International Journal of Modelling and Simulation!  Since I work for ProModel, it’s only appropriate that I share it with my fellow simulation enthusiasts.  Please let me know what you think by commenting below.

Discrete event simulation (DES) is a powerful tool that can help users make better decisions. Over the years tools such as ProModel and Process Simulator have been developed to simplify the application of simulation, decreasing the learning curve and increasing its use. One of the advantages of simulation is that it is able to create lots of data with valuable information. However, the data analysis process can be challenging and relevant information may not be fully analyzed.

Observing the opportunity to more fully learn from the data, we decided to use data mining algorithms to help in the data analysis process, and more than that, to guide the modeler to the variables that most impact the outcome of the system being modeled.

The data mining algorithm picked was Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) which has been good at learning from the data and making accurate predictions, according to the scientific literature. We applied ANNs to the data generated by the simulation model and we were able to create ANN models that could predict the simulation model results. The ANN models created were then interpreted and through the interpretation it was possible to rank variables according to their impact on the output results. This makes it possible for decision makers to know how to prioritize and where to place their investments.

Here is the abstract from the article:

This research used a discrete event simulation to create data on a shipment receiving process instead of using historical records on the process. The simulation was used to create records with different inputs and operating conditions and the resulting overall elapsed time for the overall process. The resulting records were used to create a set of predictive artificial neural network models that predicted elapsed time based on the process characteristics. Then, the connection weight approach was used to determine the relative importance of the input variables. The connection weight approach was applied in three different steps:

(1) On all input variables to identify predictive and non-predictive inputs

(2) On all predictive inputs and

(3) After removal of a dominating predictive input.

This produced a clearer picture of the relative importance of input variables on the outcome variable than applying the connection weight approach once.

You are welcome to access the published article at the journal’s website or the full original paper at the ProModel website.

 

Process Simulator 2019 – Released!

Aaron Nelson Product Development Manager Process Simulator

Aaron Nelson Product Development Manager Process Simulator

As ProModel’s new Process Simulator Product Development Manager, I’m really excited to bring you my first blog post in this position.

We launched Process Simulator 2019, our Microsoft® Visio ® plug-in, earlier this year which now supports both 64 and 32 bit Visio 2016.  We have added many other great features to this redesigned product. Check out the highlights below and get the full details on the What’s New page.

Visio 2016 64 and 32-bit support

Dockable Windows – We have redesigned all element property windows and tables and made them dockable within the Visio application work-space. This allows you to keep them open and out of the way so your diagram view space will be clear for quicker modeling changes.

Image-pcs2019-dockable-windows

Find & Replace – Process Simulator now has its own find and replace capability, separate from Visio, which will search across its elements and objects only. It even automatically brings the shape into view and opens the associated property or field where the searched text is found.

Image-pcs2019-find-replace

Model Compile – When you run your model, it is checked for errors prior to simulation. In this release, you are presented with a list of all errors, which allows you to quickly navigate to and resolve the issues.

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Referenced Hierarchical Models – Submodels now have the ability to be referenced in addition to their current capability of unique instances. This means that activities linking to the same submodel at different points in your diagram will send their entities to that exact submodel (not just unique copies of the submodel).

Activity Multi-Entity Table – We have added Multi-Entity functionality. This allows you to convert your existing models that use multi entity, and create new ones as well, without having to code the functionality using logic. In Shape Properties you can select Multi Entity and then Define.

In this initial release for our US and Canadian customers with current Maintenance and Support, you can get the download in the Solutions Café.  You can also access the Process Simulator 2019 What’s New webinar recording from the solutions cafe.  If you are not a current customer, please contact your Account Manager for details.

Process Simulator 2019 will be available to everyone later this year.  Please let me know if you have any feedback by leaving a comment below or contacting me directly. Thanks!  anelson@promodel.com